Benjamin Mohr
Anchorage | Land Manager, Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI)

“It is clear to me that salmon tie Alaskans together - both through present cultures and uses, and through time. The same thing that drew people to the Kenai/Russian confluence each summer 5,000 years ago draws me each summer as well. The realization that we're in the same place and for the same reasons as people have been for millennia somehow ties us to them.” 

Ben Mohr has worked in support of the Pebble Mine project, managed a successful United States Senate campaign, served as a Senior Policy Advisor to Governor Parnell on fish, game and public access issues, and he currently manages lands and resources at Cook Inlet Region, Inc. (CIRI). 

 

“While we had winter Chinook where I grew up in Northern California,” explains Mohr, “fish were never really my thing. However, in college I accompanied some friends to the Kenai/Russian confluence and hooked in to my first red and I haven't stopped fishing since.”  Mohr is now a sport and personal use fisherman, typically targeting the Kenai Peninsula and portions of Upper Cook Inlet.  He fishes to feed his family and for recreational enjoyment. He has developed a deep appreciation for salmon as a resource Alaskans harvest and enjoy, and for the role the gathering process plays in our lives.

 

With a young son looking forward to his first fishing trip this summer, Mohr has a personal stake in engaging in discussions of how this incredible gift will be accessed, allocated and appreciated now and in the future. “I would like to increase the wonder and respect for what a uniting element Alaska's fish resources are,” writes Mohr, “because shared experiences and values create relationships. And that appreciation and tie to history may result in a greater respect for the fish we harvest, and may also serve as a bridge across some issues which divide us as Alaskans.”

 

In addition to Mohr’s professional roles, he is a Fellow of the National Conservation Leadership Institute and a graduate of the Humanity Forum’s Leadership Anchorage program, as well as a former board member of both the Alaska Miners Association and the Alaska Humanities Forum. He holds a B.A. in Outdoor Studies from Alaska Pacific University, , and is a current board member of the Outdoor Heritage Foundation of Alaska and the Alaska Rugby Foundation.